Caterina Scaramelli

Research Assistant Professor

Office: 232 Bay State Rd., #101B
E-mail: scaramel@bu.edu

Spring 2020:?Mondays/Wednesdays, 11:15 – 12:45pm
https://calendly.com/scaramel/office-hours-spring-2020

Education
PhD,?Massachusetts Institute of Technology
BA,?London School of Economics

Areas of Expertise

Anthropology of environment, science, infrastructure, Turkey, Europe, Middle East, Mediterranean

Recent Publications

Scaramelli, Caterina. “The Delta is Dead: Moral Ecologies of Infrastructure in Turkey.” Cultural Anthropology 34, no. 3 (2019): 388–416. https://doi.org/10.14506/ca34.3.04.

Scaramelli, Caterina. “The Wetland is Disappearing: Conservation and Care on Turkey’s K?z?l?rmak Delta.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 50, no. 3 (2018): 405–25. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0020743818000788.

Scaramelli, Caterina. “Fish, Flows, and Desire in the Delta.” Anthropology News 59, no. 2 (April 2018): 3–5.

View Professor Scaramelli’s CV

Current Research
Broadly, my research centers on mutual constitutions of ecologies, scientific expertise, and infrastructures as conduits for people’s moral claims about human and non-human livelihoods.?I am completing a research project that examines the dynamic multivalence of wetlands. In Turkey, as in many other places, the wetland became an important site of everyday contestations over new and foreclosed possibilities in a time of uncertain politics and in precarious and rapidly changing environments. Wetland conservation has often reinvented and repurposed older tools of swamp reclamation to legitimize technocratic environmental management. At the same time, various social groups have also found in the wetland a fertile yet uncertain, murky, and mobile ground for cultivating new aspirations of democracy, multispecies livelihoods, and more just ecologies. I am also embarking on a new ethnographic research project on ecological precarity and mobility. In this new project, I will examine the cultural and political significance of “heirloom” seeds in the Mediterranean to explore changing experiences of health, precarity, labor, nation, race, and belonging.

Courses

· CAS AN 363: Food and Water: Critical Perspectives on Global Crises
· CAS AN 101: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology